Larger Easter and Passover celebrations boost confection sales despite higher prices

Roughly 29% of consumers surveyed by IRI in March said they planned to host or attend a meal with extended family who does not live with them to mark Easter or Passover – up from 25% from last year. Likewise, the number of people gathering to share a holiday meal this spring will inch up to about seven from fewer than six last year, IRI reports.

Plans to gather with extended families is sharper among households with young children than homes with older children no children. For example, 42% of homes with five children and under plan to dine with others compared to 38% last year. Households with older children are slightly less likely to gather with extended families, but still notably more likely than those without children. According to IRI, 39% of households with children six to 12 years will host or attend a meal with extended family compared to 33% with teenagers aged 13 to 17 years and only 25% of those with no children under the age of 18, IRI’s OmniConsumer Survey Solutions conducted in March reveals.

As Americans plan their holiday meals, IRI found more than 25% report they will spend more on groceries for their Easter and Passover celebrations compared to the last year and 50% plan to spend about the same.

Inflation impacts holiday sales

However, just because consumers are spending more, it doesn’t mean they are buying more. Rather, inflation, which IRI estimates is up 10% across food in the past year, likely is the main driver of higher grocery bills. Roughly 90% of consumers report their perception of grocery prices are “much more” or “a little more” than last year, compared to only 9% who perceive them to be about the same and 1% who said they were less than a year aug.

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